Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Lab Report - Cross Processing Kodak Ultramax in B&W Chemical

Cross processing, also known as Xpro is a technique of processing film in another film chemical either intentionally or accidentally.
In film photography, it’s the whole unexpected element of surprise when you develop your film. Cross processing makes it even more of a surprise as you can only predict to a certain extent what the results will be like. Additionally, it’s cheaper than getting black and white film.
Here’s our first experiment in cross processing and some timings in an attempt to make a very rough guide as to what results the different times will produce.
Film: Kodak Ultramax 400
Dev: Ilford LC29 (1+19)
Dev Time: 8 mins, 9 mins and 10 mins
Guide/Tips:
Expose all 12 or 36 (depending which film you’re using) shots on the same object with consistent lighting. This makes it easier to compare with different timings.
In the darkroom, cut the negs into multiple strips but not too short otherwise you can’t make a proper comparison. You might have loads of trial and error so you don’t want to waste multiple rolls on this. On top of that, you can always reuse the remaining strips for other experiments.
Here’s the most exciting part - the development time. Use a black and white film timing as a thumb of rule. As for us, we used Delta 400; a 7:30 minutes developing time (with Ilford Ilfotec LC29) and tested various timing around it.  

Here are the results (scanned as both B&W and colour negs):

B&W Scan

8 minutes

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9 minutes

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10 minutes

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Colour Scan

8 minutes

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9 minutes

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10 minutes

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It depends on your preference but our pick was the 9 minutes as the black and white scan comes up a little warmer and has a lot more depth and contrast - the 8 minutes shows up a little flat and greyish and the 10 minutes the blacks had already started to show a blueish/black tinge to them.

Saturday, May 25, 2013
explore-blog:

Stunning, artful, surprising: Vintage black-and-white photos of NASA facilities
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
What happens if you don’t get the focus accurate…

What happens if you don’t get the focus accurate…

Love the grainy effect we got with this combination of camera and film. The contrast is surprisingly high and it’s a pretty robust camera - this one needs a bit of a clean - in fact both need cleaning but are in pretty good condition. The lens is sharp although you need to be careful not to get too close to your subject. The only tricky bit is using the range finder to make sure your subject is sharply in focus. You get a kind of double vision effect if you’re not fully in focus. Once you’ve got the hang of that you’ve got a massively versatile and robust piece of kit.

All shot on Lucky 100 which added to the grainy effect which we love. It seemed to give the shots depth and a kind of moodiness you want from a camera like this.

The latest addition to our analogue family! The Argus C3 or ‘The Brick’ Just processed some films on it and the results are freaky!

The latest addition to our analogue family! The Argus C3 or ‘The Brick’ Just processed some films on it and the results are freaky!

In the meantime - here’s our last exhibition ‘Market’ based on Pudu wet market, KL. It has been at The Print Room KL and in Penang’s China House - just finished hanging it at The Warehouse Art Cafe and Gallery in Jalan Tun HS Lee. Check it out!

And not much of this…we made it through a 48 hour shoot on Bukit Bintang, KL.

And not much of this…we made it through a 48 hour shoot on Bukit Bintang, KL.

Friday, May 17, 2013
Tea break #48 hour shoot #theprintroomkl still going strong

Tea break #48 hour shoot #theprintroomkl still going strong